Credits

May 24 2019

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What’s considered a great credit score


What is the Highest Credit Score?

This content is not provided or commissioned by the issuer. Opinions expressed here are author’s alone, not those of the issuer, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the issuer. This site may be compensated through the issuer’s Affiliate Program.

The highest credit score you can achieve (under perfect circumstances) is 850 using the FICO model. However, any score over 740 is generally considered to be great and puts you in range for the best interest rates on things like credit cards, mortgages and car loans.

Introduction to Understanding the Highest Credit Score Possible

Let’s back up for a minute. Notice that we mentioned anything over 740 is generally considered to be great? That’s because credit scores are generally broken into the ranges poor, fair, good, very good, and excellent. The chart below outlines these various credit score ranges. As you can see, Excellent is generally defined as anything above 800 and 850, while a Good credit score is considered anything between 670 and 739.

FICO Credit Score Ranges

Credit Score Ranges Credit Score Values
Excellent Credit Score 800 & above
Very Good Credit Score 740 – 799
Good Credit Score 670 – 739
Fair Credit Score 580 – 669
Poor Credit Score 580 & below

Source: Fair Isaac Corporation (myFICO.com).

We’ll dive into more detail on ways to achieve the highest credit score later in this article, but for now let’s look at why it’s important to have an understanding of the highest credit score and how it can impact you.

Why is understanding the highest credit score important?

If you’re like most of the U.S. population, your credit score falls somewhere under 621. In fact, you can see from the chart below that 38 percent of people under 30 years old have a score less than 621. That said, 29 percent of people under the age of 30 are doing a bit better with a score of 621 to 680. When you consider that only 2 percent of people in this age group are actually achieving a 780 score or above, it’s clear that there’s lots of room for improvement if having the “highest credit score” is the goal.

U.S. Population Categorized by the Five FICO Ranges for Credit Scores

Age > 621 621 – 680 681 – 720 721 – 780 780 Source: We ran a survey of 1144 US consumers in different age groups on 9/26/2018 to understand which credit score ranges they fell into.

Understanding the credit ranges and what the highest credit score is can give you the motivation and knowledge needed to improve your credit score and, therefore, improve your financial ability to get better interest rates on everything from mortgages to credit cards.

Is the perfect credit score necessary?

You might be asking yourself, “Is a perfect credit score really necessary when there’s such a big range from ‘excellent’ to ‘perfect’?” No, while obtaining an 850 is a great goal, it might not be realistic. And, remember that just falling into the “Excellent” range can often reap the same benefits as having a perfect score.

An 850 score is theoretically the highest possible credit score, but 20.7 percent of Credit Sesame members have a score above 800. What’s more, as we saw in the data presented earlier, only 2 percent of people in the U.S. under 30 years old have a FICO Score greater than 780. In other words, an 850 credit score is a great goal, but it’s also an anomaly.

Comparing Credit Score Ranges of Credit Sesame Members

Credit Score Range Value Range Members
Excellent Credit Score 800 to 850 22.5%
Very Good Credit Score 750 to 799 23%
Good Credit Score 700 to 749 16%
Fair Credit Score 650 to 699 15.6%
Poor Credit Score 550 to 649 14.9%
Bad Credit Score 550 & Below 8%

Source: Credit scores were calculated from 5,000 Credit Sesame members on 2/6/18.

Why does this matter? When you purchase a car or apply for a mortgage, the lender is generally looking for you to fall within a certain range. The mortgage interest rate you qualify for will likely not change inside that particular range. For example, if you qualify for a 3.5 percent interest rate with a “Good” credit score of 720, that rate is likely not going to improve unless you reach the next tier of “Very Good” or drop below to “Fair.”

Related to “What Affects Your Credit Score”
Check Your Free Credit Score
Check your credit score for free with Credit Sesame to understand where you stand with TransUnion and what you can do to improve your credit based on the factors we are discussing.
Analyze Your Free Credit Report
Explore your free credit report card from Credit Sesame to get an understand of what parts of your credit profile is impacting your credit score the most.
Learn How to Build Credit
Learn the best ways to build your credit score and what techniques you can use to maintain it.
Easily Improve Your Credit Score
Discover the different ways that you can improve your credit score and learn about the different ways our members have used our platform for that purpose.

What is the highest possible credit score you can achieve?

At this point, it should be noted that each credit bureau (Experian, TransUnion, Equifax) and each scoring model (FICO vs. VantageScore 3.0) have slight variations in their scoring ranges. What’s considered “Excellent” for TransUnion might be slightly different than what’s considered “Excellent” for Equifax.

Credit Score Ranges: TransUnion (VantageScore 3.0), Equifax, Experian

Credit Bureau Excellent Good Fair Poor Very Poor
TransUnion 781 – 850 720 – 780 658 – 719 601 – 657 300 – 600
Equifax 760 – 850 725 – 759 660 – 724 560 – 659 280 – 559
Experian 750 – 850 700 – 749 650 – 699 550 – 649 350 – 549

Source: Information sourced from each individual bureau’s openly distributed range data,specifically, from the official pages of TransUnion, Equifax and Experian.

As you can see by the above table, different credit scoring agencies vary on what credit scores fall into what range. The primary reason for these differences is the scoring algorithm each credit bureau uses. One reason for this is that each agency’s definition is different when it comes to what score corresponds with which category.

Now, let’s look at how you can take this information and utilize it to not only improve your credit score but also improve your financial situation.

Benefits of knowing the maximum credit score

As we mentioned before, knowing the maximum credit score is important because it gives you a framework for what’s possible and it helps you understand how much improvement you need to make in order to break into that “Excellent” threshold.

If you’re like most of the U.S. population, you have some room for improvement. Let’s look at some of the ways you can improve your credit score.

Ways to improve your credit score

According to recent Credit Sesame data, 72 percent of Gen Z and 83 percent of millennials are actively trying to improve their credit score. The same data (below) show that older generations (Gen X and Baby Boomers) are not focused on improving their score as much, perhaps indicating that they’ve already made these efforts and have a credit score they’re happy with.

Percentages of Americans Improving Their Credit Score Categorized by Generation

Age Improving (2014) Improving (2015) Improving (2016) Improving (2017)
Gen Z (up to age 23) 67% 69% 71% 72%
Millennials (23 – 34) 73% 77% 81% 83%
Generation X (35 – 54) 70% 69% 67% 66%
Baby Boomers (55+) 38% 36% 36% 34%

Source: Credit Sesame surveyed 510 adults from July 14, 2018 to July 20, 2018.

If you’re looking to improve your score, there are some basics that you can work on. Those are:

  1. Pay your bills on time
  2. Keep your credit card balances low
  3. Make an effort to keep your oldest accounts open
  4. Manage your available credit vs. debt ratio
  5. Don’t have too many inquiries for new credit
  6. Keep an eye on your credit report

If you put some of these strategies into play, it’s not difficult to move from one credit ranking to another. In fact, we surveyed consumers over the course of 24 months to see how long it took to move between credit ranges. Here’s what we found:

The Length of Time to Improve Credit Score and Move into Different Credit Ranking

Credit Score Range (Start) Credit Score Range (End) Average Time Taken
Poor Credit Score Fair Credit Score 8 Months
Fair Credit Score Good Credit Score 14 Months
Good Credit Score Excellent Credit Score 7 Months

Source: We surveyed 455 consumers over the course of 24 months to understand on average how long it takes to move between credit ranges starting 2/15/2016 to 2/15/2018.

How to keep a great credit score

It may come as no surprise that many of the same strategies used to improve your credit score are the ones used to maintain a great credit score.

As you can see below, an overwhelming number of Credit Sesame members note paying their bills on time as a great way to maintain a good score. You’ll also see that keeping your credit card balances low, keeping old accounts open, and managing your debt are a few other best practices.

How Do Credit Sesame Members Maintain Good Credit Scores

Method Millennials Generation X Baby Boomers Silent Generation
Pays Bills on Time 79% 78% 68% 60%
Low Credit Card Balances 75% 75% 73% 69%
Retain Old Credit Accounts 72% 69% 73% 74%
Manages Debt 74% 73% 71% 69%
Restrict New Applications 67% 68% 68% 69%
Watches Credit Report 74% 71% 70% 68%

Source: Credit Sesame surveyed 325 members during the week of November 12, 2017 to November 19, 2017.

These strategies, of course, are directly related to the factors that contribute to your overall score. For example, paying your bills on time accounts for roughly 35 percent of your credit score. Signing up for automatic payments to avoid missed or late payments can be a way to keep your high credit score.

Similarly, your credit utilization (which is the total available credit you have vs. the total debt you have), accounts for 30 percent of your credit score. When you keep your balances low, this improves your credit utilization and therefore helps keep your score high.

For more detail on the factors that impact your score and how to maintain them, be sure to explore this recent article on credit score factors.

If you’re wondering if achieving a high credit score is realistic, read how Hillary, one of our Credit Sesame members, was able to increase and maintain her score in just one year.

How Hillary grew her credit score from good to excellent in 1 year

Member Since: 10/14/2016

We interviewed Hillary on May 14, 2018. She earns $54,000 a year, is 42 years old and lives in Fresno, Calif. She is married with two children and owns a house with her husband.
What is the most helpful thing you’ve done to achieve a high credit score?
Setting automatic payments on all of my credit cards has been extremely helpful. My credit card payments are due at different times during the month, along with all my other bills. I used to get overwhelmed even when I had the money to make my monthly payment. Automatic payments ensure my payments are submitted on time, which has not just improved my credit score, but taken away a lot of stress.
How do you continue to maintain your high score?
I’m always sure to make on-time payments, only use 30 percent of my available credit, and monitor my credit so I can be made aware whenever my credit report changes. When my score decreases, I look to see what caused the drop and then work to fix the problem. Credit Sesame is very useful for keeping an eye on my score each month.

Hillary’s story is a great reminder that monitoring your credit can be a good way to educate yourself on how little actions can have big impacts on your score. When you see the impact that on-time payments or better credit utilization can have on your score, for example, it makes it easier to know how to improve and maintain a great score. Watching your score fluctuate via a credit monitoring service can give you the insight you need to learn and make adjustments.

Getting the highest credit score possible

When you’re familiar with what the highest credit score is, how to achieve it, and how to maintain it, you’re putting yourself in a better financial situation. Your credit score impacts your ability to make big purchases like a home or car, and it also impacts smaller things like whether or not you have to put a deposit down when applying for utilities or a cell phone.

While getting a perfect score of 850 may be a long shot, getting a score in the “Good” or “Excellent” range is certainly attainable and, if you follow some of the steps outlined in this article, you’ll be well on your way to financial freedom.

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SOURCE: http://www.creditsesame.com/blog/credit-score/what-is-the-highest-credit-score/
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Written by CREDIT


May 24 2019

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What’s considered a great credit score \ Video

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What’s considered a great credit score


What is the Highest Credit Score?

This content is not provided or commissioned by the issuer. Opinions expressed here are author’s alone, not those of the issuer, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the issuer. This site may be compensated through the issuer’s Affiliate Program.

The highest credit score you can achieve (under perfect circumstances) is 850 using the FICO model. However, any score over 740 is generally considered to be great and puts you in range for the best interest rates on things like credit cards, mortgages and car loans.

Introduction to Understanding the Highest Credit Score Possible

Let’s back up for a minute. Notice that we mentioned anything over 740 is generally considered to be great? That’s because credit scores are generally broken into the ranges poor, fair, good, very good, and excellent. The chart below outlines these various credit score ranges. As you can see, Excellent is generally defined as anything above 800 and 850, while a Good credit score is considered anything between 670 and 739.

FICO Credit Score Ranges

Credit Score Ranges Credit Score Values
Excellent Credit Score 800 & above
Very Good Credit Score 740 – 799
Good Credit Score 670 – 739
Fair Credit Score 580 – 669
Poor Credit Score 580 & below

Source: Fair Isaac Corporation (myFICO.com).

We’ll dive into more detail on ways to achieve the highest credit score later in this article, but for now let’s look at why it’s important to have an understanding of the highest credit score and how it can impact you.

Why is understanding the highest credit score important?

If you’re like most of the U.S. population, your credit score falls somewhere under 621. In fact, you can see from the chart below that 38 percent of people under 30 years old have a score less than 621. That said, 29 percent of people under the age of 30 are doing a bit better with a score of 621 to 680. When you consider that only 2 percent of people in this age group are actually achieving a 780 score or above, it’s clear that there’s lots of room for improvement if having the “highest credit score” is the goal.

U.S. Population Categorized by the Five FICO Ranges for Credit Scores

Age > 621 621 – 680 681 – 720 721 – 780 780 Source: We ran a survey of 1144 US consumers in different age groups on 9/26/2018 to understand which credit score ranges they fell into.

Understanding the credit ranges and what the highest credit score is can give you the motivation and knowledge needed to improve your credit score and, therefore, improve your financial ability to get better interest rates on everything from mortgages to credit cards.

Is the perfect credit score necessary?

You might be asking yourself, “Is a perfect credit score really necessary when there’s such a big range from ‘excellent’ to ‘perfect’?” No, while obtaining an 850 is a great goal, it might not be realistic. And, remember that just falling into the “Excellent” range can often reap the same benefits as having a perfect score.

An 850 score is theoretically the highest possible credit score, but 20.7 percent of Credit Sesame members have a score above 800. What’s more, as we saw in the data presented earlier, only 2 percent of people in the U.S. under 30 years old have a FICO Score greater than 780. In other words, an 850 credit score is a great goal, but it’s also an anomaly.

Comparing Credit Score Ranges of Credit Sesame Members

Credit Score Range Value Range Members
Excellent Credit Score 800 to 850 22.5%
Very Good Credit Score 750 to 799 23%
Good Credit Score 700 to 749 16%
Fair Credit Score 650 to 699 15.6%
Poor Credit Score 550 to 649 14.9%
Bad Credit Score 550 & Below 8%

Source: Credit scores were calculated from 5,000 Credit Sesame members on 2/6/18.

Why does this matter? When you purchase a car or apply for a mortgage, the lender is generally looking for you to fall within a certain range. The mortgage interest rate you qualify for will likely not change inside that particular range. For example, if you qualify for a 3.5 percent interest rate with a “Good” credit score of 720, that rate is likely not going to improve unless you reach the next tier of “Very Good” or drop below to “Fair.”

Related to “What Affects Your Credit Score”
Check Your Free Credit Score
Check your credit score for free with Credit Sesame to understand where you stand with TransUnion and what you can do to improve your credit based on the factors we are discussing.
Analyze Your Free Credit Report
Explore your free credit report card from Credit Sesame to get an understand of what parts of your credit profile is impacting your credit score the most.
Learn How to Build Credit
Learn the best ways to build your credit score and what techniques you can use to maintain it.
Easily Improve Your Credit Score
Discover the different ways that you can improve your credit score and learn about the different ways our members have used our platform for that purpose.

What is the highest possible credit score you can achieve?

At this point, it should be noted that each credit bureau (Experian, TransUnion, Equifax) and each scoring model (FICO vs. VantageScore 3.0) have slight variations in their scoring ranges. What’s considered “Excellent” for TransUnion might be slightly different than what’s considered “Excellent” for Equifax.

Credit Score Ranges: TransUnion (VantageScore 3.0), Equifax, Experian

Credit Bureau Excellent Good Fair Poor Very Poor
TransUnion 781 – 850 720 – 780 658 – 719 601 – 657 300 – 600
Equifax 760 – 850 725 – 759 660 – 724 560 – 659 280 – 559
Experian 750 – 850 700 – 749 650 – 699 550 – 649 350 – 549

Source: Information sourced from each individual bureau’s openly distributed range data,specifically, from the official pages of TransUnion, Equifax and Experian.

As you can see by the above table, different credit scoring agencies vary on what credit scores fall into what range. The primary reason for these differences is the scoring algorithm each credit bureau uses. One reason for this is that each agency’s definition is different when it comes to what score corresponds with which category.

Now, let’s look at how you can take this information and utilize it to not only improve your credit score but also improve your financial situation.

Benefits of knowing the maximum credit score

As we mentioned before, knowing the maximum credit score is important because it gives you a framework for what’s possible and it helps you understand how much improvement you need to make in order to break into that “Excellent” threshold.

If you’re like most of the U.S. population, you have some room for improvement. Let’s look at some of the ways you can improve your credit score.

Ways to improve your credit score

According to recent Credit Sesame data, 72 percent of Gen Z and 83 percent of millennials are actively trying to improve their credit score. The same data (below) show that older generations (Gen X and Baby Boomers) are not focused on improving their score as much, perhaps indicating that they’ve already made these efforts and have a credit score they’re happy with.

Percentages of Americans Improving Their Credit Score Categorized by Generation

Age Improving (2014) Improving (2015) Improving (2016) Improving (2017)
Gen Z (up to age 23) 67% 69% 71% 72%
Millennials (23 – 34) 73% 77% 81% 83%
Generation X (35 – 54) 70% 69% 67% 66%
Baby Boomers (55+) 38% 36% 36% 34%

Source: Credit Sesame surveyed 510 adults from July 14, 2018 to July 20, 2018.

If you’re looking to improve your score, there are some basics that you can work on. Those are:

  1. Pay your bills on time
  2. Keep your credit card balances low
  3. Make an effort to keep your oldest accounts open
  4. Manage your available credit vs. debt ratio
  5. Don’t have too many inquiries for new credit
  6. Keep an eye on your credit report

If you put some of these strategies into play, it’s not difficult to move from one credit ranking to another. In fact, we surveyed consumers over the course of 24 months to see how long it took to move between credit ranges. Here’s what we found:

The Length of Time to Improve Credit Score and Move into Different Credit Ranking

Credit Score Range (Start) Credit Score Range (End) Average Time Taken
Poor Credit Score Fair Credit Score 8 Months
Fair Credit Score Good Credit Score 14 Months
Good Credit Score Excellent Credit Score 7 Months

Source: We surveyed 455 consumers over the course of 24 months to understand on average how long it takes to move between credit ranges starting 2/15/2016 to 2/15/2018.

How to keep a great credit score

It may come as no surprise that many of the same strategies used to improve your credit score are the ones used to maintain a great credit score.

As you can see below, an overwhelming number of Credit Sesame members note paying their bills on time as a great way to maintain a good score. You’ll also see that keeping your credit card balances low, keeping old accounts open, and managing your debt are a few other best practices.

How Do Credit Sesame Members Maintain Good Credit Scores

Method Millennials Generation X Baby Boomers Silent Generation
Pays Bills on Time 79% 78% 68% 60%
Low Credit Card Balances 75% 75% 73% 69%
Retain Old Credit Accounts 72% 69% 73% 74%
Manages Debt 74% 73% 71% 69%
Restrict New Applications 67% 68% 68% 69%
Watches Credit Report 74% 71% 70% 68%

Source: Credit Sesame surveyed 325 members during the week of November 12, 2017 to November 19, 2017.

These strategies, of course, are directly related to the factors that contribute to your overall score. For example, paying your bills on time accounts for roughly 35 percent of your credit score. Signing up for automatic payments to avoid missed or late payments can be a way to keep your high credit score.

Similarly, your credit utilization (which is the total available credit you have vs. the total debt you have), accounts for 30 percent of your credit score. When you keep your balances low, this improves your credit utilization and therefore helps keep your score high.

For more detail on the factors that impact your score and how to maintain them, be sure to explore this recent article on credit score factors.

If you’re wondering if achieving a high credit score is realistic, read how Hillary, one of our Credit Sesame members, was able to increase and maintain her score in just one year.

How Hillary grew her credit score from good to excellent in 1 year

Member Since: 10/14/2016

We interviewed Hillary on May 14, 2018. She earns $54,000 a year, is 42 years old and lives in Fresno, Calif. She is married with two children and owns a house with her husband.
What is the most helpful thing you’ve done to achieve a high credit score?
Setting automatic payments on all of my credit cards has been extremely helpful. My credit card payments are due at different times during the month, along with all my other bills. I used to get overwhelmed even when I had the money to make my monthly payment. Automatic payments ensure my payments are submitted on time, which has not just improved my credit score, but taken away a lot of stress.
How do you continue to maintain your high score?
I’m always sure to make on-time payments, only use 30 percent of my available credit, and monitor my credit so I can be made aware whenever my credit report changes. When my score decreases, I look to see what caused the drop and then work to fix the problem. Credit Sesame is very useful for keeping an eye on my score each month.

Hillary’s story is a great reminder that monitoring your credit can be a good way to educate yourself on how little actions can have big impacts on your score. When you see the impact that on-time payments or better credit utilization can have on your score, for example, it makes it easier to know how to improve and maintain a great score. Watching your score fluctuate via a credit monitoring service can give you the insight you need to learn and make adjustments.

Getting the highest credit score possible

When you’re familiar with what the highest credit score is, how to achieve it, and how to maintain it, you’re putting yourself in a better financial situation. Your credit score impacts your ability to make big purchases like a home or car, and it also impacts smaller things like whether or not you have to put a deposit down when applying for utilities or a cell phone.

While getting a perfect score of 850 may be a long shot, getting a score in the “Good” or “Excellent” range is certainly attainable and, if you follow some of the steps outlined in this article, you’ll be well on your way to financial freedom.

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SOURCE: http://www.creditsesame.com/blog/credit-score/what-is-the-highest-credit-score/
#tags#[replace: -,-What’s considered a great credit score]#tags#

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Written by CREDIT


May 24 2019

Произвольный текст и макросы до содержимого файла

What’s considered a great credit score \ Video

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Произвольный текст и макросы до содержимого файла, REMMONT.COM

What’s considered a great credit score


What is the Highest Credit Score?

This content is not provided or commissioned by the issuer. Opinions expressed here are author’s alone, not those of the issuer, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the issuer. This site may be compensated through the issuer’s Affiliate Program.

The highest credit score you can achieve (under perfect circumstances) is 850 using the FICO model. However, any score over 740 is generally considered to be great and puts you in range for the best interest rates on things like credit cards, mortgages and car loans.

Introduction to Understanding the Highest Credit Score Possible

Let’s back up for a minute. Notice that we mentioned anything over 740 is generally considered to be great? That’s because credit scores are generally broken into the ranges poor, fair, good, very good, and excellent. The chart below outlines these various credit score ranges. As you can see, Excellent is generally defined as anything above 800 and 850, while a Good credit score is considered anything between 670 and 739.

FICO Credit Score Ranges

Credit Score Ranges Credit Score Values
Excellent Credit Score 800 & above
Very Good Credit Score 740 – 799
Good Credit Score 670 – 739
Fair Credit Score 580 – 669
Poor Credit Score 580 & below

Source: Fair Isaac Corporation (myFICO.com).

We’ll dive into more detail on ways to achieve the highest credit score later in this article, but for now let’s look at why it’s important to have an understanding of the highest credit score and how it can impact you.

Why is understanding the highest credit score important?

If you’re like most of the U.S. population, your credit score falls somewhere under 621. In fact, you can see from the chart below that 38 percent of people under 30 years old have a score less than 621. That said, 29 percent of people under the age of 30 are doing a bit better with a score of 621 to 680. When you consider that only 2 percent of people in this age group are actually achieving a 780 score or above, it’s clear that there’s lots of room for improvement if having the “highest credit score” is the goal.

U.S. Population Categorized by the Five FICO Ranges for Credit Scores

Age > 621 621 – 680 681 – 720 721 – 780 780 Source: We ran a survey of 1144 US consumers in different age groups on 9/26/2018 to understand which credit score ranges they fell into.

Understanding the credit ranges and what the highest credit score is can give you the motivation and knowledge needed to improve your credit score and, therefore, improve your financial ability to get better interest rates on everything from mortgages to credit cards.

Is the perfect credit score necessary?

You might be asking yourself, “Is a perfect credit score really necessary when there’s such a big range from ‘excellent’ to ‘perfect’?” No, while obtaining an 850 is a great goal, it might not be realistic. And, remember that just falling into the “Excellent” range can often reap the same benefits as having a perfect score.

An 850 score is theoretically the highest possible credit score, but 20.7 percent of Credit Sesame members have a score above 800. What’s more, as we saw in the data presented earlier, only 2 percent of people in the U.S. under 30 years old have a FICO Score greater than 780. In other words, an 850 credit score is a great goal, but it’s also an anomaly.

Comparing Credit Score Ranges of Credit Sesame Members

Credit Score Range Value Range Members
Excellent Credit Score 800 to 850 22.5%
Very Good Credit Score 750 to 799 23%
Good Credit Score 700 to 749 16%
Fair Credit Score 650 to 699 15.6%
Poor Credit Score 550 to 649 14.9%
Bad Credit Score 550 & Below 8%

Source: Credit scores were calculated from 5,000 Credit Sesame members on 2/6/18.

Why does this matter? When you purchase a car or apply for a mortgage, the lender is generally looking for you to fall within a certain range. The mortgage interest rate you qualify for will likely not change inside that particular range. For example, if you qualify for a 3.5 percent interest rate with a “Good” credit score of 720, that rate is likely not going to improve unless you reach the next tier of “Very Good” or drop below to “Fair.”

Related to “What Affects Your Credit Score”
Check Your Free Credit Score
Check your credit score for free with Credit Sesame to understand where you stand with TransUnion and what you can do to improve your credit based on the factors we are discussing.
Analyze Your Free Credit Report
Explore your free credit report card from Credit Sesame to get an understand of what parts of your credit profile is impacting your credit score the most.
Learn How to Build Credit
Learn the best ways to build your credit score and what techniques you can use to maintain it.
Easily Improve Your Credit Score
Discover the different ways that you can improve your credit score and learn about the different ways our members have used our platform for that purpose.

What is the highest possible credit score you can achieve?

At this point, it should be noted that each credit bureau (Experian, TransUnion, Equifax) and each scoring model (FICO vs. VantageScore 3.0) have slight variations in their scoring ranges. What’s considered “Excellent” for TransUnion might be slightly different than what’s considered “Excellent” for Equifax.

Credit Score Ranges: TransUnion (VantageScore 3.0), Equifax, Experian

Credit Bureau Excellent Good Fair Poor Very Poor
TransUnion 781 – 850 720 – 780 658 – 719 601 – 657 300 – 600
Equifax 760 – 850 725 – 759 660 – 724 560 – 659 280 – 559
Experian 750 – 850 700 – 749 650 – 699 550 – 649 350 – 549

Source: Information sourced from each individual bureau’s openly distributed range data,specifically, from the official pages of TransUnion, Equifax and Experian.

As you can see by the above table, different credit scoring agencies vary on what credit scores fall into what range. The primary reason for these differences is the scoring algorithm each credit bureau uses. One reason for this is that each agency’s definition is different when it comes to what score corresponds with which category.

Now, let’s look at how you can take this information and utilize it to not only improve your credit score but also improve your financial situation.

Benefits of knowing the maximum credit score

As we mentioned before, knowing the maximum credit score is important because it gives you a framework for what’s possible and it helps you understand how much improvement you need to make in order to break into that “Excellent” threshold.

If you’re like most of the U.S. population, you have some room for improvement. Let’s look at some of the ways you can improve your credit score.

Ways to improve your credit score

According to recent Credit Sesame data, 72 percent of Gen Z and 83 percent of millennials are actively trying to improve their credit score. The same data (below) show that older generations (Gen X and Baby Boomers) are not focused on improving their score as much, perhaps indicating that they’ve already made these efforts and have a credit score they’re happy with.

Percentages of Americans Improving Their Credit Score Categorized by Generation

Age Improving (2014) Improving (2015) Improving (2016) Improving (2017)
Gen Z (up to age 23) 67% 69% 71% 72%
Millennials (23 – 34) 73% 77% 81% 83%
Generation X (35 – 54) 70% 69% 67% 66%
Baby Boomers (55+) 38% 36% 36% 34%

Source: Credit Sesame surveyed 510 adults from July 14, 2018 to July 20, 2018.

If you’re looking to improve your score, there are some basics that you can work on. Those are:

  1. Pay your bills on time
  2. Keep your credit card balances low
  3. Make an effort to keep your oldest accounts open
  4. Manage your available credit vs. debt ratio
  5. Don’t have too many inquiries for new credit
  6. Keep an eye on your credit report

If you put some of these strategies into play, it’s not difficult to move from one credit ranking to another. In fact, we surveyed consumers over the course of 24 months to see how long it took to move between credit ranges. Here’s what we found:

The Length of Time to Improve Credit Score and Move into Different Credit Ranking

Credit Score Range (Start) Credit Score Range (End) Average Time Taken
Poor Credit Score Fair Credit Score 8 Months
Fair Credit Score Good Credit Score 14 Months
Good Credit Score Excellent Credit Score 7 Months

Source: We surveyed 455 consumers over the course of 24 months to understand on average how long it takes to move between credit ranges starting 2/15/2016 to 2/15/2018.

How to keep a great credit score

It may come as no surprise that many of the same strategies used to improve your credit score are the ones used to maintain a great credit score.

As you can see below, an overwhelming number of Credit Sesame members note paying their bills on time as a great way to maintain a good score. You’ll also see that keeping your credit card balances low, keeping old accounts open, and managing your debt are a few other best practices.

How Do Credit Sesame Members Maintain Good Credit Scores

Method Millennials Generation X Baby Boomers Silent Generation
Pays Bills on Time 79% 78% 68% 60%
Low Credit Card Balances 75% 75% 73% 69%
Retain Old Credit Accounts 72% 69% 73% 74%
Manages Debt 74% 73% 71% 69%
Restrict New Applications 67% 68% 68% 69%
Watches Credit Report 74% 71% 70% 68%

Source: Credit Sesame surveyed 325 members during the week of November 12, 2017 to November 19, 2017.

These strategies, of course, are directly related to the factors that contribute to your overall score. For example, paying your bills on time accounts for roughly 35 percent of your credit score. Signing up for automatic payments to avoid missed or late payments can be a way to keep your high credit score.

Similarly, your credit utilization (which is the total available credit you have vs. the total debt you have), accounts for 30 percent of your credit score. When you keep your balances low, this improves your credit utilization and therefore helps keep your score high.

For more detail on the factors that impact your score and how to maintain them, be sure to explore this recent article on credit score factors.

If you’re wondering if achieving a high credit score is realistic, read how Hillary, one of our Credit Sesame members, was able to increase and maintain her score in just one year.

How Hillary grew her credit score from good to excellent in 1 year

Member Since: 10/14/2016

We interviewed Hillary on May 14, 2018. She earns $54,000 a year, is 42 years old and lives in Fresno, Calif. She is married with two children and owns a house with her husband.
What is the most helpful thing you’ve done to achieve a high credit score?
Setting automatic payments on all of my credit cards has been extremely helpful. My credit card payments are due at different times during the month, along with all my other bills. I used to get overwhelmed even when I had the money to make my monthly payment. Automatic payments ensure my payments are submitted on time, which has not just improved my credit score, but taken away a lot of stress.
How do you continue to maintain your high score?
I’m always sure to make on-time payments, only use 30 percent of my available credit, and monitor my credit so I can be made aware whenever my credit report changes. When my score decreases, I look to see what caused the drop and then work to fix the problem. Credit Sesame is very useful for keeping an eye on my score each month.

Hillary’s story is a great reminder that monitoring your credit can be a good way to educate yourself on how little actions can have big impacts on your score. When you see the impact that on-time payments or better credit utilization can have on your score, for example, it makes it easier to know how to improve and maintain a great score. Watching your score fluctuate via a credit monitoring service can give you the insight you need to learn and make adjustments.

Getting the highest credit score possible

When you’re familiar with what the highest credit score is, how to achieve it, and how to maintain it, you’re putting yourself in a better financial situation. Your credit score impacts your ability to make big purchases like a home or car, and it also impacts smaller things like whether or not you have to put a deposit down when applying for utilities or a cell phone.

While getting a perfect score of 850 may be a long shot, getting a score in the “Good” or “Excellent” range is certainly attainable and, if you follow some of the steps outlined in this article, you’ll be well on your way to financial freedom.

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SOURCE: http://www.creditsesame.com/blog/credit-score/what-is-the-highest-credit-score/
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May 24 2019

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How do i check my credit history & Video

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How do i check my credit history

About Us Overview

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We’re the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), a U.S. government agency that makes sure banks, lenders, and other financial companies treat you fairly.

Where can I get my credit score?

Answer:

You actually have more than one credit score. Credit scores are calculated based on the information in your credit reports. If the information about you in the credit reports of the three large consumer reporting companies is different, your credit score from each of the companies will be different. Lenders also use slightly different credit scores for different types of loans.

There are four main ways to get a credit score:

Check your credit card or other loan statement. Many major credit card companies and some auto loan companies have begun to provide credit scores for all their customers on a monthly basis. The score is usually listed on your monthly statement, or can be found by logging in to your account online.

Talk to a non-profit counselor. Non-profit credit counselors and HUD-approved housing counselors can often provide you with a free credit report and score and help you review them.

Use a credit score service. Many services and websites advertise a “free credit score.” Some sites may be funded through advertising and not charge a fee. Other sites may require that you sign up for a credit monitoring service with a monthly subscription fee in order to get your “free” score. These services are often advertised as “free” trials, but if you don’t cancel within the specified period (often as short as one week), you could be on the hook for a monthly fee. Before you sign up to try one of these services, be sure you know what you are signing up for and how much it really costs.

Buy a score. You can buy a score directly from the credit reporting companies. You can buy your FICO credit score at myfico.com

. Other services may also offer scores for purchase. If you decide to purchase a credit score, you are not required to purchase credit protection, identity theft monitoring, or other services that may be offered at the same time.

Some credit score sources provide an “educational” credit score, instead of a score that a lender would use. The CFPB published a report on the differences between educational scores and those used by lenders

. For most people, an educational score will be close to the scores lenders use and can be helpful for consumers. But the scores can be quite different for some. Our report found a meaningful difference for one out of four people. When choosing where to get your credit score, find out what kind of score it is.

Always get and review your credit reports, which you can do at no cost to you at www.AnnualCreditReport.com

. Your credit scores are calculated based on the information in your credit reports. If there are errors on your credit reports, they can reduce your scores unnecessarily.

The content on this page provides general consumer information. It is not legal advice or regulatory guidance. The CFPB updates this information periodically. This information may include links or references to third-party resources or content. We do not endorse the third-party or guarantee the accuracy of this third-party information. There may be other resources that also serve your needs.

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